Weather


Canada-BC-Vancouver

Average winter and summer high temperatures across Canada vary from region to region. Winters can be harsh in many parts of the country, particularly in the interior and Prairie provinces, which experience a continental climate, where daily average temperatures are near −15 °C (5 °F), but can drop below −40 °C (−40 °F) with severe wind chills.[120] In non-coastal regions, snow can cover the ground for almost six months of the year, while in parts of the north snow can persist year-round. Coastal British Columbia has a temperate climate, with a mild and rainy winter. On the east and west coasts, average high temperatures are generally in the low 20s °C (70s °F), while between the coasts, the average summer high temperature ranges from 25 to 30 °C (77 to 86 °F), with temperatures in some interior locations occasionally exceeding 40 °C (104 °F).

VANCOUVER, BC
Vancouver is one of Canada's warmest cities in the winter. Vancouver's climate is temperate by Canadian standards and is classified as oceanic or marine west coast, which under the Köppen climate classification system is classified as Cfb that borders on a warm summer Mediterranean Climate Csb. While during summer months the inland temperatures are significantly higher, Vancouver has the coolest summer average high of all major Canadian metropolitan areas. The summer months are typically dry, with an average of only one in five days during July and August receiving precipitation. In contrast, there is some precipitation during nearly half the days from November through March.

Vancouver is also one of the wettest Canadian cities. However, precipitation varies throughout the metropolitan area.

Winters in Greater Vancouver are the fourth mildest of Canadian cities after nearby Victoria, Nanaimo and Duncan, all on Vancouver Island.         

Vancouver

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Ave Max °C

6

8

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12

16

19

21

22

18

13

8

6

Ave Min °C

1

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3

5

9

11

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14

11

7

3

1

Rainy days

21

16

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18

14

14

9

9

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21

21

Snowy days

4

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0

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Weather information obtained/edited for use on our website from http://www.holiday-weather.com/


USA-Alaska-Anchorage

The climate in Southeast Alaska is a mid-latitude oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification: Cfb) in the southern sections and a subarctic oceanic climate (Köppen Cfc) in the northern parts. On an annual basis, southeast is both the wettest and warmest part of Alaska with milder temperatures in the winter and high precipitation throughout the year. 

The climate of Anchorage and south central Alaska is mild by Alaskan standards due to the region's proximity to the seacoast. While the area gets less rain than southeast Alaska, it gets more snow, and days tend to be clearer. On average, Anchorage receives 16 in (41 cm) of precipitation a year, with around 75 in (190 cm) of snow, although there are areas in the south central which receive far more snow. It is a subarctic climate (Köppen: Dfc) due to its brief, cool summers.

The climate of Western Alaska is determined in large part by the Bering Sea and the Gulf of Alaska. It is a subarctic oceanic climate in the southwest and a continental subarctic climate farther north. The temperature is somewhat moderate considering how far north the area is. This region has a tremendous amount of variety in precipitation. 

The climate of the interior of Alaska is subarctic. Some of the highest and lowest temperatures in Alaska occur around the area near Fairbanks. The summers may have temperatures reaching into the 90s °F (the low-to-mid 30s °C), while in the winter, the temperature can fall below −60 °F (−51 °C). Precipitation is sparse in the Interior, often less than 10 in (25 cm) a year, but what precipitation falls in the winter tends to stay the entire winter.

ANCHORAGE
Many people consider the period between May and September to be the best time to visit Anchorage. The month of June usually has the best combination of long days, good weather, and warm afternoons.

As you would expect in the high northern latitudes, the longest days come around the summer solstice, 21 June, and they get quite short around the winter solstice, 21 December.

In the summer, Anchorage averages an amazing 19.5 hours of sunlight each day. By March the days begin to feel noticeably longer. However, winter offsets this imbalance when Anchorage averages just 5 hours of sunlight each day.

Anchorage

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Ave Max °C

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5

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Ave Min °C

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-10

-6

-1

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9

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Rainy days

4

3

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6

13

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16

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18

13

6

5

Snowy days

9

7

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3

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4

8

11

 

Weather information obtained/edited for use on our website from



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